The Telegraph 18 Oct 2011

The incredible stone balancing artist

Adrian Gray, a Dorset artist creates 'magical' installations by simply balancing stones on top of one another.

Mr Gray, of Lyme Regis, spends hours scouring his local beach to select the ideal sized rocks, boulders and pebbles to create his one-off sculptures.

Once found, the 44 year-old artist then arranges them into seemingly gravity defying positions by very carefully "feeling" the balancing point of each rock he handles – a process that requires supreme skill and great patience. Each artwork takes hours to perfect.

In order to avoid them toppling on beach goers, Mr Gray dismantles them after taking a picture for his gallery, which now includes photographs of dozens of the sculptures.

Mr Gray's obsession with stone balancing began nine years ago when, as an adventure holiday tour guide, he caught a tropical virus while exploring in Madagascar.

He eventually got over the infection but it left him with some unusual side-affects, including a major sensitivity to electricity which has forced him to shun all technology, living as he does in a one-room limestone house carved out of the cliffside above the beach with no phone, television or computer.

"I had a lot of time on my hands and, it was during this difficult time that I immersed myself in my art and concentrated on creating improbable and beautiful stone balancing sculptures.

"The process of balancing the stones had an almost meditative quality, both calming and therapeutic."

But not everyone believes his art is genuine, with sceptics previously accusing him of using Blu Tack or even glue to hold the stones in place.

"I show the images on my website and some people are sceptical about them, but most people have taken time to watch the video's I have made, which show how I balance the stones and make the sculptures," he said>

"And if people disbelieve what they are seeing it means I have achieved my aim of creating art that has a sense of wonder and magic, which I think a lot of contemporary art nowadays is lacking."